Is the crisis in Iraq a failure of U.S. policy?

guardia de seguridad iraquí

Iraq lives after days of intense violence offense ISIS.
What happened to the “sovereign, stable and independent” Iraq that the U.S. president, Barack Obama, said he left in 2011, when he announced the withdrawal of its last troops after a military intervention nearly a decade?
Nearly three years after that statement, Obama said Thursday that it is considering “all options” to help return stability to that country beset by a wave of violence by the radical insurgent group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS, for its acronym in English).
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The military progress in Iraq ISIS has been tapped by Republican opposition in the U.S. to qualify as a “failure” Obama policy in the Middle East.
The Speaker of the House of Representatives, Republican John Boehner, said that progress in Iraq is at risk and asked Obama to get involved.
The rebels “are 160 kilometers from Baghdad, what the president is doing? Leaning a nap,” Boehner criticized.
Reveal? These days of intense violence a failure of U.S. policy in Iraq?

personas escapan de la violencia

Iraq at the wheel
people fleeing violence
Violence in Iraq has brought hundreds of thousands to flee their homes.
James Jeffrey, the U.S. ambassador in Iraq between 2010 and 2012, thinks so.
Speaking to the BBC, Jeffrey said that “the same reasons that we walked there (Iraq) are the same issues that are in play today. Therefore this is a failure.”
“The problem is that our goals in Iraq were contradictory in nature,” he said. “We wanted to create a stable, mature and safe country, but we also wanted to create a country with determination and did not want to lead a colonial enterprise for decades.”
“So in the end the Iraqis had to sit in the driver’s seat and one of the things they did was decide not to allow forces agreement that we would keep troops there.”
According to Jeffrey, one of the ways that could contain the violence is precisely U.S. military aid.

Obama

people fleeing violence
Violence in Iraq has brought hundreds of thousands to flee their homes.
James Jeffrey, the U.S. ambassador in Iraq between 2010 and 2012, thinks so.
Speaking to the BBC, Jeffrey said that “the same reasons that we walked there (Iraq) are the same issues that are in play today. Therefore this is a failure.”
“The problem is that our goals in Iraq were contradictory in nature,” he said. “We wanted to create a stable, mature and safe country, but we also wanted to create a country with determination and did not want to lead a colonial enterprise for decades.”
“So in the end the Iraqis had to sit in the driver’s seat and one of the things they did was decide not to allow forces agreement that we would keep troops there.”
According to Jeffrey, one of the ways that could contain the violence is precisely U.S. military aid.

conflicto en Mosul

Washington will increase its aid
The U.S. government told the BBC he does not think I go into detail about their diplomatic discussions with Iraq, although it said it will increase its aid to the country.
A statement on Wednesday attributed to Bernadette Meehan, spokesman for the National Security Council at the White House, notes that Washington has “accelerated shipments of military equipment from the beginning of the year” and “redoubled his training to Iraqi security forces.”
“Our attendance has been exhaustive, is continuous and increase.”
The former ambassador, however, made a clarification: “Given the role played by the United States since 1945, when something bad happens in the world there is a tendency to feel that is an American failure, as if America had been smarter or had made more effort could have possibly avoid it. “
But Iraq is a particularly important case for the United States for the role played by the country’s foreign policy in Washington in the last decade: Obama himself said in 2011 that more than 1.5 million Americans paid service there over 30,000 wounded and nearly 4,500 died.
Conditions for removal
Unlike the former ambassador, counterintelligence analyst Patrick Johnston, of the Rand Corporation, a think tank with offices in Washington, believes in dialogue with the BBC that it is an exaggeration to speak of failures.
Obama
Obama said it is considering all options to stop the advance of ISIS.
Johnston said that some of the conditions that put the United States to an acceptable withdrawal “were fulfilled” at the time. In particular, he mentions the establishment of an elected government or the “civil war between Sunnis and Shiites had largely dissipated.”
In addition, the analyst believes that the problem is not only in Iraq but also in neighboring Syria, where ISIS controls considerable territory in the east and has been strengthened during the war.
According to Johnston, it is easy to question the situation in retrospect, but at the time of the withdrawal of U.S. war in Syria had not increased to the current endpoint.
Hence the U.S. policy in Iraq would probably have been different from being able to foresee the intensification of the Syrian conflict.
The White House, meanwhile, has tried to separate the conflict in Syria and Iraq, and on Wednesday the spokesman Josh Earnest said.
However, the political class in Washington there is a clear concern that the same group, ISIS, is working in the two countries and threaten regional security.
conflict in Mosul
One of the cities affected by the violence of ISIS is Mosul, the country’s second.